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Donald Charles Kaufmann, Jr

February 19, 1950 ~ March 9, 2020 (age 70)

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Donald Charles Kaufmann Jr, age 70, of Spokane WA passed away on 3/9/2020 at SHMC, Spokane WA. He was born in NY, NY on 2/19/1950 and grew up in Southern New Jersey. He enlisted in the US Navy and was a Vietnam Era Veteran. He received a Bachelors Degree from the University of Idaho in 1978. He volunteered at the L’Arche of Spokane where he met and later married Ulrike Scholz/Kaufmann in 1981. He worked with the developmentally disabled. He resided at the Spokane Veterans home for the last 5 years and was very appreciative of the care he received.   He was a member of St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, 3rd order Franciscan, Knights of Columbus. He had a passion for Gonzaga Basketball and he loved trees and planted many in his life. He visited many of the Shrines of Europe including Lourdes, Fatima and Altoetting. He had a special devotion to Our Lady Queen of Peace and visited Medjugorje many times.  He was a supporter of the American Life League, Human Life International, Eternal Word to the World Global Catholic Network and Catholic Charities. Don was Eucharistic Minister for the sick and shut ins, worked in the prison ministry in Airway Heights and the House of Charity.  He was preceded in death by his parents Donald and Evelyn (Sykes) Kaufmann. He will always be loved and never be forgotten by those he leaves behind. He is survived by his son Josh S. Kaufmann and by his 8 siblings and their families who all live on the East Coast: Caye, Den, Jeannette, Mike, Beth, Bernadette, Doug and Paul.  Memorial contributions are suggested to Catholic Charities.  Per the current quarantine advisory, a private family burial will take place at the Queen of Peace Cemetery. 

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Queen of Peace

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